Hi-fidelity Stereophonic Design

When I stop into my local Goodwill, I usually head straight to the vinyl records section. I just gotta know what obscure album might be there or if today is the day I find that one album I’ve always been looking for. I’m also on the lookout for great design. Every once in a while I come across a cover design so strong, that it just stops me in my tracks. That’s how I discovered my first Command Records album.

Command produced records in the late ’50s to mid-’60s and were produced and engineered by Enoch Light, a pioneer in stereo recordings during a time when AM (monaural) radio was the standard. Many of the covers were designed by well-known artists/designers like Josef Albers and Paul Bacon. Josef Albers! These abstract, minimalist covers stood apart from the typical covers of the time and beautifully captured the essence of the music through expressive design and well-crafted compositions. The covers gave the listener an idea of what to expect — a crisp, modern, stereo sound that’s harmonious, but with a sense of playfulness. Most of the Command Records covers incorporated classic design principles brilliantly: balance, proportion, rhythm, emphasis and unity in a modern style that still looks fresh today.

What a great example of form and content working well together. Stereophonic design, indeed.

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Tuomey Healthcare System

TUOMEY 100th ANNIVERSARY WEBSITE DESIGN

First Community Bank

FIRST COMMUNITY BANK WEBSITE DESIGN

Meet the Interrobang

One of the greatest aspects of being a writer is the creative latitude you magically attain when you receive your writing license in the mail (<- see?). In all seriousness, what’s appealing about writing is the fluidity of the English language.

Each year more words are added to dictionaries and it’s often a big news occasion. So while some unfortunate words are emblazoned on the vernacular until eternity (I cannot bear to link to twerk), we get useful new ones like hackable, food coma and protoplanet.

Punctuation even gets a little jolt every now and again, too. Ever heard of an interrobang? You mean you haven’t?! An interrobang is just perfect for those applications that call for a question mark but also demand the emphasis of an exclamation point. Thus, interrobang.

In the olden days of typesetting, some type families contained a unique glyph: the two different marks superimposed upon each other. Today, we just type them out side by side and I kinda dig it in the proper application.

What do you mean there’s no bacon left?!

Why haven’t you sponsored our bowling team yet?!

When is use of the font Papyrus ever okay?!

One of the most enjoyable things about writing is the vastness of your available canvas. It’s an endlessness that permeates the profession from finished product to tools to medium.

Language is in a constant state of evolution. How cool is that?!

Inspiration Everywhere

While waiting in the examination room at my eye doctor, I noticed the archetypal medical poster on the wall depicting normal and abnormal conditions of the eye, complete with cutaway illustrations of eyeballs and eyeball parts, with precise labeling and detailed information. This observation inspired me to create my own poster — but for type-geeks and non-type-geeks alike. – RE